Where Are We At In The Fight Against Alzheimer’s?

Every year during this time of year there are organizations and individuals across the country putting together their own “Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s®.” This is a great opportunity to raise funds to fight back against the disease that more than 6.5 million Americans 65 and older are estimated to have according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Our team at Elder Advisors Law is proud to be a part of this year’s walk in Waukesha, Wisconsin. We are raising money for the walk on September 10th. We believe it’s important to continue taking these steps to chip away at a disease that’s projected to grow exponentially in the coming years.

Projected Growth in Cases

Right now, the numbers may appear bleak but that doesn’t mean progress is impossible. As noted above, it’s estimated that more than 6.5 million Americans 65 and over are fighting the disease. However, that number is expected to nearly double to 12.7 million by 2050. It’s possible that population growth and other factors get that number to as high as 16 million.

This is all dependent on little-to-no advancements in treatment and prevention, however. The hope lies in the possibility that scientists, healthcare officials, and experts are able to make progress in fighting the disease. Thankfully, we’ve actually seen important developments already in 2022.

Research Advancements

Even if numbers are expected to grow in the coming years, important new research has revealed previously unknown factors for the disease. Funds from the Walk to End Alzheimer’s goes directly to important research like this so we can continue to fight for our loved ones, ourselves, and for future generations.

In April a team of researchers announced that 42 previously unknown genes connected to Alzheimer’s disease had been uncovered. This was part of the “largest study of genetic risk for Alzheimer’s to date.” While researchers do believe certain lifestyle choices can contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s and other cognitive disorders, this research can point to genetic factors that are likely more significant indicators. When we understand where a disease comes from we are better equipped to prepare for it and, ultimately, defeat it.

Thankfully, the important research developments in 2022 don’t stop there. Another single gene that was identified (MGMT) is believed to be an important factor in why women are two-thirds more likely to develop Alzheimer’s.

What Comes Next?

These advancements are incredibly important in the overall fight against the disease, and organizations got another big boost when congress approved a nearly $300 million increase in funding for Alzheimer’s and dementia research. These funds along with the funds independent groups raise through their walks and other efforts will directly contribute to the fight.

Unfortunately, with such big money in Alzheimer’s research, you’re likely to find some bad actors along the way. Allegations of fraud recently came out in relation to an alleged Alzheimer’s drug and the process researchers claim to have used in developing the drug. You should do your own research before donating to any cause.

What we’re all going to need is an honest, consistent, and compassionate effort to defeat Alzheimer’s. It’s called The Walk to End Alzheimer’s because the goal is to end it, not just lessen the impact. Improvements along the way are just part of the ultimate goal of a world without diseases like this.

At Elder Advisors Law, we’re proud to be a part of this fight and will continue our passionate advocacy for people with Alzheimer’s and other cognitive disorders. We help families and protect generations from Wisconsin all the way down to Florida. Contact our team today.

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Elder Advisors Law

As Leaders in Estate Planning and Elder Law, we are passionate about helping families protect their hard-earned assets from the government, nursing homes, lawsuits or other predators.

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